justseventeen:August 1988 ‘I really care about…

justseventeen:

August 1988 ‘I really care about him… I don’t want to see him hurt…’

Holy smokes, that’s Tarzan: the Epic Adventures actor Joe Lara! No doubt in his pre-Tarzan modeling days. 

You may remember Tarzan: the Epic Adventures for an absolutely incredible toy line, possibly one of the best ever, by arguably the greatest toy company that ever existed, Trendmasters. They included a disk inside each figure with games, and had a website (this was in 1994!). They released figures not just of Tarzan, but of other ERB characters like John Carter, a Rykor, a Horib, Mahars, Dejah Thoris, Tars Tarkas, and a plantman. Dejah Thoris faced off against a Rykor. 

The commercials were out of this world. This was from the company that released such amazing toys as the War Planets line, and Godzilla toys, the first time most Americans ever saw the 1980s series Mechagodzilla and Mecha-King Ghidorah.

American born expat film star Carl Scott, who …

American born expat film star Carl Scott, who in Hong Kong in the late 1970s, starred in “Kung Fu Executioner,” “A Hard Way to Die” (a very fun movie, also called Sun Dragon) and “Soul Brothers of Kung Fu.” 

Karate and Kung Fu course booklets in comic bo…

Karate and Kung Fu course booklets in comic books. 

The reason these were so omnipresent is that it takes a lot of money to ship things like weights, whereas postage for easy to fold instructional guides was way cheaper. 

Wall-E trinket box found at Box Lunch.

Wall-E trinket box found at Box Lunch.

Oh it’s literally never going away

Oh it’s literally never going away

Starlog magazine article that announced they w…

Starlog magazine article that announced they were making a Conan the Barbarian movie in March, 1981. Before the blogs, Starlog was the one place to get news about scifi and fantasy media.

Frederick A. Sayfarth. 

Frederick A. Sayfarth. 

A lot of people say that Luke Cage, Power Man,…

A lot of people say that Luke Cage, Power Man, Hero for Hire was the first black superhero with his own comic. This is true. However, the first black hero with his own comic was Lobo at Dell Publishing, a western adventure outlaw. 

Fun fact: even at the height of the moral panic over crime comics in the 1950s, Dell was the only publisher that never joined the comics code authority, and you’ll note they don’t have a comics code seal on their covers. This was because, as a company that primarily published Disney comics, their in-house standards were even more stringent than the code. 

A lot of people say that Black Panther was the first black hero at Marvel. This is not true. He was preceded by a full decade by the Atlas-era jungle action hero Waku, Prince of the Bantu, a sort of black Tarzan, with a little Conan and Umslopagaas mixed in, created by pre-Marvel Universe scribe Whitney Ogden. I guess it depends if you consider the Atlas-era comics canon (and they are, since many things showed up in them later). You know, I wonder why they never called on Waku to be in the 1950s Avengers team, Agents of Atlas…possibly because it’s not clear when his stories were set: it could be any point after the iron age and the Bantu Migrations. 19th Century, maybe? Early 20th? Heck, maybe even “modern day” (50s) in a very rural region.

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A Watt, if you will

A Watt, if you will

Which would you choose

Which would you choose